Tractors, Mushrooming, & Drag Shows

At 8:30am last Thursday morning, I arrived at a field in nearby Ropice via car with one of Albrechtova’s agricultural teachers and three female students. Outfitted with my borrowed polka-dotted rain boots, I took in the view; after a few days of rain, the sun was glistening on the grass’s morning dew. I greeted two other students who had driven the tractor earlier in the morning to the field.

Translating, a student turned to me – “Our teacher wants to know if you’ve ever driven a tractor before.” 

I shook my head and laughed.

“Do you have a driver’s license?”

I nodded. “Ano” (yes), I answered in Czech.

“Okay,” The student informed me. 

“So first, you will sit in the tractor and watch two students drive. Then, it’s your turn.” While I had known for a few days that a tractor excursion was in my future, I wasn’t sure if I’d actually be allowed to drive it myself. I looked a bit nervously at the few already-plowed perfectly straight lines. Who knew that I’d be learning to drive a big red tractor in a town of 1,500 in the Czech Republic.

I hopped in, ready to listen carefully in an attempt to not destroy their well-plowed work. Once inside, two agricultural students used their new tractor vocabulary to talk me through the steps.

“So, you will put down plow, press clutch and then first……”

“Gear,” Another student filled in for him.

“First gear. Then slowly release clutch and press gas here. Then you can go.”

“You want to keep the tire in the fallow.” The other student added as we bumped our way down the first plowing run. Despite the relatively simple instructions, tractor driving proved to be difficult at times. Driving is bumpy, you have to back up and avoid trees and other objects on the sides of the field, and sod occasionally gets stuck in the plow part of the tractor. Admittedly, I did kill the engine one time, but I was proud as can be when one student asked me, “Are you sure this is your first time driving a tractor?” 

For the rest of the morning, I alternated between riding in the tractor, driving the tractor, and sitting in the field with the students taking breaks. It was my first time interacting with a small group of students, and I value the time that we had to get to know one another. Students in practical fields have certain days “out of school” for practical lessons. Some professions alternate between one week of class and one week of work, while others have off a couple of days every other week during which they have practical experiences.

Visiting an animal exhibition with agriculture students

The students at Albrechtova have a wide range in English level, which is largely dependent on their chosen field of study (some will take advanced final exams called “Maturita” and some will not). And, interestingly, I’ve noticed that many students with advanced English either spend time watching English movies/videos or playing video games and speaking in English over a headset to native-speaking friends. 

A large majority of the students seem interested in getting to know me and take advantage of the chance to practice English no matter their level. It is wonderful to feel so welcomed. As I begin to build relationships in the school, I have been extremely thankful that many students have asked about the after-school clubs that I will soon be starting, have showed in interest in U.S. politics and the differences between our countries, and have invited me to join in on activities that they enjoy.

Just this morning, I said yes to attending a latin dance class taught by a student in about a week and going skiing with a student this winter (a sport I’ve never tried!). This year, I’m aware of the exciting opportunity to be both a teacher and a learner. In the past few weeks, I’ve talked to students about topics varying from American football, the difference in drinking ages and driving licenses, politics, healthcare, and university student loans. They’ve wondered and asked what students in the U.S. learn about the Czech Republic, whether or not I like Czech food and beer, and why I chose to come to their town.

Trying fried cheese & Czech beer – Smažený sýr and České pivo!  

Additionally, I spend time every day learning. My mentor has been kind enough to begin weekly (much needed!) Czech lessons with me, and I’m learning to distinguish the difference between Czech, Polish, and a regional dialect spoken in my area. I’m navigating a new school, different computer keyboard set-ups, and learning the proper greetings for people of various ages. Each week, I’m trying new activities and I’m learning to laugh at myself when I make mistakes. I’m navigating complex topics surrounding the current United States news and political situations. And, I’m learning to ask questions and listen to learn more about the life experiences of my new friends.

When I applied for Fulbright Czech Republic last October, I knew that being flexible and open were vital components for a successful application and a successful lifestyle as a Fulbrighter. Once I arrived here, I was reminded of how valuable these traits are because learning to “adult” for the first time in a foreign place can be challenging. For example, tasks that are mindless and part of one’s daily routine back home like running errands, paying a bill, or ordering at a restaurant become new adventures. I would like to give a major shoutout to the Google Translate app and especially, the photo → translate feature for saving me many times. I’m also lucky that I’m an adventurous eater with 0 food allergies!

One of my favorite things about Czech people is that they like to plan ahead and set times to do activities with one another. Going out to eat with friends is less common here, so many people prefer to go out for coffee or to try an activity. I love quality time and going to new places, and I am extremely grateful to my new colleagues at work for inviting me on many adventures already. 

This past weekend, I was invited to attend a drag show and to go mushrooming. Originally, I don’t know which invitation shocked me more — the fact that a small village restaurant was hosting a drag show event or the news that most Czech people regularly participate in the fall sport/hobby/obsession that is mushrooming. 

Both events were fantastic. At the drag show on Friday, I appreciated the attendees young and old who put their regular lives on pause for a moment to laugh and enjoy. My mentor translated some of the Czech jokes for me and I even was pulled up on “stage” with them to dance for a song.

I took Saturday to recover and to prepare myself for the full Czech “mushrooming” experience. On Sunday morning, I was surprised to see the crowd at the train station. The teachers accompanying me explained that Sunday morning is a popular time for many to head to the mountains for a day of exploration. There were older groups of “pensioners,” groups with mountain bikes, many with hiking gear, families, and others with baskets ready to be filled with mushrooms.

Enjoying the view with colleagues and friends

We rode the train for about 30 minutes south to a town near the Czech/Slovakia/Polish/Czech tri-border and began our walk up the hill. On our hike, we joked and laughed while they taught me about how to tell a good edible mushroom from a bad one. I made up nicknames for the bad ones – jellyfish mushrooms (nearly translucent), alien mushrooms (crazy orange colors), and monster mushrooms (large rotten ones). We spent the entire morning winding through trails, going deeper into the dark parts of the forest, and sharing the excitement when a good mushroom was spotted. There were many opportunities for good photo cameos with the beautiful mushrooms, which were surprisingly hard to find!

After a day of mushrooming, you’ll find Czechs sharing photos of mushrooms and discussing prime mushrooming conditions, but never sharing their prized mushrooming locations in the forest. After enjoying some freshly made cheese from a farm and a coffee at the top of the hill, we made our way back home where my mentor’s husband showed me how to clean and then cook the mushrooms. It was a rewarding feeling to make meals at home with our hand-picked beauties. 

This Friday, I am headed to visit a fellow Fulbrighter in a nearby town called Frenštát and we will then head to Prague together on Sunday for a second Fulbright orientation. When I return, my teaching responsibilities will continue to increase now that my school has a confirmed schedule for the semester. I’m looking forward to getting to know more students in small group settings and to building relationships with those in my community — two things that make life here even more of a home! 

 

 

Czech Republic Fulbright

First week of work & establishing new routines

It takes time for new places to become familiar, to develop new norms and routines after old ones have grown to feel natural. In May, the moment that truly jolted me and forced me to realize that my time at Elon was coming to an end was not my final day of class or even my final day of student teaching. I was shopping at Aldi one Sunday afternoon, picking out my weekly essentials and determining how to best finish the food in my pantry during my final week. As if she knew that it was my last grocery trip, the check-out woman even complimented my strategic placing of items onto the check-out belt (heaviest items towards the front, bananas and delicate items at the back, obviously). 

I took my bags to my car and then pushed my cart back up to the store entrance. At Aldi, you must place a quarter in the cart to detach it from the others. I locked my cart back into the bunch retrieved my quarter and then returned to my car. The loom of graduation hit me suddenly as I set my quarter back down in its home spot in my little Honda Civic where it would typically wait until the next Sunday where I would retrieve it once again for our Aldi trip. But, this time, I realized that there would be no more trips. Instead, I pulled out my wallet and set the quarter into the coin pouch to later be spent and return to its normal life as a quarter moving from wallet to store and back again.

Not unlike that quarter, I’d soon be leaving my home base at Elon where I’d been returning for the past 4 years to join society in new larger ways and to develop a new routine in a new location. Now, in the Czech Republic, my weekly Sunday grocery trips are at a store called Kaufland that is filled with familiar products labeled with different names, items I’ve never seen before, and a challenge that comes every time I check out and have to tell the check-out person, “nemluvim ceske.”

This week, I (mostly) successfully navigated my first week at school. I presented an introduction Powerpoint in 5 different classes at Albrechtova and began building relationships with students. While an introduction Powerpoint may seem like a small feat, finding my way through a new school with very different routines can prove challenging. For example, in the Czech Republic, teachers do not have a permanent classroom, but rotate every class and use an office as their “home base.” Additionally, when the school bell rings (or at my school, a fun song), that means that students must be in their classrooms — not the teacher. The teachers do not make their way to the classroom until the final bell rings, then making their way from their respective offices. At Albrechtova, classes are spread out over 3 floors and in two buildings that are a 7 minute walk away from each other (confusing!). Additionally, students rotate classes on a bi-weekly schedule and have different classes each day.

In front of the main building of Albrechtova

I’d also been warned that students would stand when the teacher entered the room. I’m not quite sure if the looks on their faces when they saw me enter with their regular class teacher was surprise or nervousness (I’m sure it wasn’t too different from the look on my own face), but over the course of the first lesson, we grew more comfortable with one another.

I shared photos with the students of popular Texas cuisine, our average weather forecast in Grapevine, my family and friends, and of course, Elon. In turn, the students then told me about their practical fields of study at Albrechtova (even in English classes they are divided by this field of study), and asked me a variety of questions about Texas, driving licenses, gun laws in America, the border wall, and the American healthcare system. I attempted a few Czech words, made references to High School Musical and the infamous yellow school busses that have been made famous in American shows and movies, and before I knew it, my first week came to a close. Next week will be another week with an adjusted schedule before the school releases the permanent schedule for the semester.

Over the next few weeks, my mentor and I will be setting up some after-school clubs that I’ll be leading. So far, our ideas for clubs include some small group extra English lessons, an American culture club, English teacher lessons, and lessons to the non-English teachers. Many students commute to school via trains and busses, so we will have to see what types of clubs students are interested in. While this may seem like a lot of extra activities, some clubs will be bi-weekly meetings and as Fulbrighters, we do not teach a full course load.

As the weeks go by, I’ll be continuing to both establish my new routines and seek discomfort through saying yes and embracing new opportunities and invites that come my way. And now, a new Czech Kč coin has made its home in a special spot in my wallet, ready to be deployed each Sunday on my weekly trip to the Kaufland grocery store.  

Photos from the week:

Above: Photos taken in Tesin during a tour of town given by a Albrechtova student

Below: Enjoying a local concert & Polish beerfest with my mentor and her family

Celebrating my mentor’s husband’s birthday

Below: Today I am enjoying a local coffeeshop on a rainy Saturday. In my free time I am writing, blogging, and studying Czech!

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This post is not an official Department of State publication. The views and information presented are my own and do not represent the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, the Department of State, the Fulbright Commission, or the host country.

Czech Republic Fulbright

Initial Impressions + Brno ETA Orientation

Hello, everyone!

I have now officially been in the Czech Republic for one whole week! Each day has been full of meeting new people, getting settled in, and preparing for the months ahead. In this post, I will share an overview of my arrival to my town of Český Těšín, orientation in Brno, and cultural differences that I’ve noticed thus far.

As always, please leave a comment below if you have any questions or would like to request any specific posts!

**Český Těšín is pronounced (Ch-eh-ski Teh-shin).

Arriving to Český Těšín

In the Czech Republic, I have learned that individual teachers often take responsibility for hosting a “project” or beginning a new idea at his or her school. I was under the impression that my school had applied for a Fulbright ETA, but it turned out that my mentor, Gabi, was really the one who applied and has been planning my stay here.

Gabi and her family have been extremely generous to me already during my time here and I am looking forward to getting to know them even better during these 10 months.

Gabi arranged a flat for me at her next-door neighbor’s house. It is the upstairs portion of the home and is spacious and cozy. I have a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and a hallway with storage space for hats and purses and such. I knew as soon as I saw the purple bed and bookshelves that I would quickly feel right at home.

The flat is also in a great location. It is approximately a 10 minute walk to the school, a 10 minute walk to a grocery store, and a 15 minute walk from the train station and the border crossing.

Of course, my pillow pet swagasaurous made the journey
Experiencing a wonderful Czech welcome on the night of my arrival

After sleeping a lot and unpacking, I set off with the other Fulbright ETA in my town, Sarah, to explore the town. We are the only two Czech Republic ETAs who are placed in the same town, and I feel very lucky to have her here!

As I’ve discussed in a previous post, my town is split by the Czech/Polish border. It was an incredible feeling to walk across the bridge for the first time. While the Czech side feels more residential, it does have a few restaurants, grocery stores, and shops that are all very walkable. On the other hand, the Polish side is more lively with people out and about shopping and sitting outside at cafes and most people that I’ve met so far agree that it is more beautiful.

The Czech town hall and main square in Český Těšín
The Polish main square in Cieszyn
One thing I love about the Czech Republic so far is the importance placed upon having a beautiful backyard (always called a garden) and spending time outdoors.

My school placement

One thing I was surprised to find out during orientation was how much importance is placed upon our position not only as a teaching assistant, but also as an American ambassador in our towns. For example, we do not teach a full-time teacher course-load as it is also important for us to be active members of our towns and our communities.

The Czech Fulbright commission purposefully does not allow schools in Prague to apply for an ETA, and prefers to give opportunities to schools in smaller towns who do not have convenient access to native English speakers.

The Czech secondary school system is much different than in the US. Students apply to two secondary schools at the age of about 14 or 15 and can pick a school anywhere they please. In other words, many students commute to the school, which makes it challenging for students to stay for after school clubs or sports.

There are SO many types of speciality schools, but the two main categories (from my understanding) are “gymnasium” schools, which typically prepare students for university, and practical or vocational schools, which prepare students for trades and careers.

Vocational schools can have one focus or many focuses. Some types I’ve heard about so far include military, engineering, nursing, art schools, pedagogical teaching schools, forestry schools, and many more.

Here is a photo of my school, Albrechtova! It is home to 750 students and about 60 teachers and is located in 2 buildings.

At my school, I will teach English lessons every week to students of various ages and also visit practical lessons. Gabi informed me last night that some of my additional activities will include visiting agricultural classes and learning to milk a cow and plow with a tractor as well as collaborating with culinary students to cook Thanksgiving dinner.

I am hoping to run an after school English club, but I am waiting to see how the first week of school goes and what students are interested in since many commute. The first couple of weeks, I will mainly be observing as the school has a temporary schedule for a while.

I was surprised to learn that schools have no particular start time or end time. While the government sets a start date and end date for school, each school day can start and end at various times. If a teacher does not have a lesson until “3rd period” or is done at the end of the day, it is also fine to go home.

Additionally, it is easier to take students on field trips or outside during the day because there isn’t really a need for waivers and paperwork like there is in American schools.

Many of my students who work in trades such cooking or becoming a waiter work at this local coffeeshop called Avion.

ETA training in Brno

New friends!

I spent Tuesday-Friday in Brno, the Czech Republic’s second largest city. Brno is located in the Moravian region of the Czech Republic and is very lively. My cohort of 31 spent each day from 8:30-5 in sessions about the Fulbright program, teacher training, cultural differences to expect, and safety guidelines.

In the evenings we tried local food and of course, some local Czech beer. It was so nice to meet the rest of my cohort and spend the week becoming friends. We have a limited amount of days allowed out of the country, and are highly encouraged to spend some weekends visiting each other and getting to better know the Czech Republic. We will meet again soon for a further orientation in Prague!

Enjoying various Czech folk performances in the Old Town Hall

Exploring the city of Brno

Cultural differences

Since I have only been here one week so far, I have not yet been able to ascertain more complex cultural differences. However, I wanted to note some smaller differences that I have either noticed or were discussed by the Fulbright Commission during our Brno orientation.

I think that this list will be fun for me to look back on after 10 months immersing myself in the culture.

  • Air conditioning is rare
  • Showers mainly have detachable shower-heads and not overhead showers
  • Bug screens are not common on windows/doors
  • The drinking culture is more relaxed and can often be seen on the street or in some workplaces
  • If a Czech person asks you to get coffee or come visit their vacation home, they firmly intend to set a plan
  • Shoes should be taken off in the home and some schools even require teachers to change shoes from street shoes to school shoes
  • Czech women have the ending “ova” added to their last names. For example, my last name would be “Kobosova”

People are known for being more direct and may smile less or appear less outwardly friendly to Americans

This evening, I am attending the birthday party of Gabi’s husband in their garden and then attending a local beer festival on the Polish side of town with a colleague!

Since school will start on Monday and orientation is now over, I will be spending this week observing various classes at the school, continuing to adjust to my new life here and building regular healthy routines such as cooking, walking/jogging in the local park, journaling, and studying Czech!

Thank you for reading,

Courtney

Czech Republic Fulbright

Packing for a year abroad: How I packed for 10 months in the Czech Republic in one suitcase

Hello! Or in Czech, Dobrý den! I am happy to share that I have arrived safely in my new home for the next 10 months, Český Těšín, Czech Republic. I am currently writing at a little table in my apartment overlooking the garden and several colorful houses in the neighborhood after spending the afternoon exploring the Polish side of town.

Since Český Těšín is located quite far from Prague (about a 4 hour train ride), I decided that it would be best to pack in one large suitcase and carry-ons. After learning the hard way at London Heathrow during my semester in England that lugging two big suitcases is exhausting, I knew that it would be better to pack light and buy things in the Czech Republic if needed.

My biggest piece of packing advice is to lay out everything that you want to pack in one central area. I set up a folding table and in the two weeks prior to my departure, I began to lay out items. Using this method helped me both to determine what I still needed to pack or purchase and where I could cut back.

When packing for the trip, I chose to pack lighter in categories of items that I knew would be relatively inexpensive and easy to purchase once I arrived (toiletries, shirts, decor, etc). I was more strategic with things that are either expensive or fit in a specific manner (think jeans, electronics, coats!)

The packing master (my mom!) helping me roll clothes

Luggage

For luggage I brought one large suitcase, which ended up weighing in at 49 pounds, one large backpack to put in the overhead compartment on the flight, and a black tote bag for my personal item that I plan to use as my work bag here in the Czech Republic.

I packed the heaviest items like shoes and sweaters in this backpack so that my suitcase would not go over the weight limit!

Carry-on items

From left to right: Laptop, important documents, small lock, water bottle, camera, portable charger, computer charger, kindle, airpods, regular headphones, snack pouch, various chargers, journal and pens, tic tacs, chapstick, money belt, passport + cover
Small purse and wallet

Tops

4 graphic t-shirts for working out, sleeping, traveling
3 workout shirts – one short sleeve, two tank tops

2 plain short-sleeve tops
Three long-sleeve layering tops (navy, dark green, black)
6 blouses (1 did not make the photo)
2 cardigans
4 dresses that all can be paired with tights in the colder months

Pants and shorts

Black jeans, blue jeans, black work pants, navy work pants
3 pairs of workout leggings
Sweatpants, pajama set, tights, spandex shorts
Two pairs of shorts

Shoes

Flip flops, sandals, black booties, workout shoes, sneakers, work shoes

Winter gear

6 sweaters of various weights
3 scarves

3 pairs of gloves, 1 hat, 1 umbrella

4 jackets: Medium weight coat, rain jacket, winter/cold rain jacket, light jacket

Random

1 swimsuit

Small daypack and travel towel
Pillow case (not the pillow), sleep mask, pillow pet

Mesh laundry bag
Small jewelry pouches with versatile jewelry

Thank you for reading and for supporting my new Fulbright adventure! If you’d like to continue to hear about my Fulbright adventures, please follow me on WordPress or like my Facebook page, @CourtneyTasteTravelTeach where I’ll be posting photos and sharing my blog posts! Soon, I’ll be posting more about my first impressions of my town and about Fulbright training in Brno, Czech Republic.

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This post is not an official Department of State publication. The views and information presented are my own and do not represent the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, the Department of State, the Fulbright Commission, or the host country.

Czech Republic Fulbright

Prague

After much deliberation, I have to say that Prague is probably my favorite city that I’ve seen in Europe so far. I’m not quite sure what it is about the Czech Republic but we were all completely enamored. After hearing good reviews from our friends, we decided to book an Airbnb for 4 nights and I’m so glad we did!

Our Airbnb was a quick tram ride down the river from Prague’s Old Town. The public transportation in the area is absolutely stellar and SO cheap. I’m not sure if we have just adjusted to Oxford prices or if everything really is that cheap, but either way, we were happy gals. The 72 hour tram pass will only cost you about 11 USD and a normal lunch runs from 4-7 USD. Beer is cheaper than water in this town!

Day 1

On Day 1, we decided to orient ourselves in our favorite manner – a Free Walking Tour! As I’ve said before, this is one of the best (and cheapest!) ways to get familiar with a city while getting some of the history in. I think that one of the reasons I love Prague so much is because of my Eastern European ancestry. Visiting has made me all the more curious to learn about my family’s past! Our tour explored Old Town, New Town, and the Jewish Quarter. The tour guide did a wonderful job of switching the mood from light, to funny, to serious. She told stories about the horrors of the Jewish Quarter – where Jews were forced to live in the low, flooded, slums. Disease ran rampant and few jobs were available to them. The Nazi’s sent cars of Jews from here away to Poland where they were murdered and many children were left without parents. Now, you can tour a museum full of these children’s’ drawings expressing their emotions during these times.

Before the war started, Czechoslovakia was betrayed by their allies and handed over to Hitler who did not just take back German lands, as he had promised, but took over the whole country and set up a base in Prague. As a result, the city was completely untouched during the war and therefore, a large portion is original. This is completely different from many other European cities that I have visited and the contrast is stark. Prague is stunning – a mix of 11 types of architecture built along the river. When you walk around, you must look up and simply admire everything.

Now, the Jewish Quarter has been raised above river-level and is beautiful. Today, it houses many of the city’s rich inhabitants. The history in the Czech Republic is very fresh. After the war, they turned towards communism in attempt to rebuild. Our tour guide’s parents were actually deeply affected by communism. Her grandparents refused to “vote” for the communist President (which was mandated by law) and as a result, lost their jobs and their daughter’s place at her university. Despite these barriers, the grandparents stayed strong in their beliefs and continued to stand up against communism with many other Czech people. The Czech’s escape from communism is referred to as the “Velvet Revolution” and their split from the Slovaks as the “Velvet Divorce”. These splits hold a lesson for all of us – peace is possible.

After our long morning tour, we crossed the absolutely beautiful Charles Bridge to the John Lennon wall which, to be honest, was a bit disappointing! It is much smaller than we expected! However, it is still a must-see spot for first time tourists and a great photo opportunity. Truly, the best part of Prague is just walking around and soaking up some sun.

Next came nap time and after that, a traditional Czech meal. The only way to really describe Czech food is delicious, savory, and heavy. Think meats and bread dumplings drowned in gravy and delicious sauce. Duck and schnitzel are of course, also popular items. This is definitely the type of food that stays in your stomach all day! We tried to taste some Czech cuisine throughout the trip but alternate with some lighter meals.

In the evening, we Czech-ed (haha) out some of Prague’s nightlife which of course included some delicious local beers.

Day 2

For our second day of the trip, we signed up for a group day trip to the nearby town of Kutna Hora! For only about 20 dollars a person, we got a nearly all day tour that lasted from 12-6! This was a great way to do something unique and experience a smaller Czech town. After about an hour train ride, we arrived in the town of Kutna Hora. Our first stop was a tour of the Church of Bones, also known as the Sedlec Ossuary. I don’t even know how exactly to explain what this is other than to show photos. The chandelier has every bone in the human body.

The Church of Bones was decorated with, yes, real human bones of about 40,000 people after the town’s graveyard got too large, largely because of the Plague. First, they dug up the bones and placed them underneath the church, but someone eventually decided that they should be cleaned and used as decoration.

Walking through was more eerie and creepy than we expected. Nothing is really blocked off either – you are standing face to face with dozens of human skulls.

In addition to touring the Bone Church, we also got to see the beautiful St. Barbara’s Cathedral and some of the town!

Day 3

Easter Sunday! When we woke up, we were confused to find that no one really seemed to be celebrating Easter. We brushed it off, knowing that the Czech Republic is the most atheist country in the world, and decided to head to a Catholic Mass anyway. The church was absolutely stunning (as most European churches are). While I missed being home with family, celebrating with my friends was so much fun!

Later in the day, we actually realized that the Czech Republic celebrates their Easter on Monday! Their traditions are quite interesting. Men walk around with braided sticks which they use to bop women. Then, the women must thank them and give them shots of alcohol and food. Supposedly, this prevents the women from growing old. When we were headed out on Monday, we did see quite a few men wandering around with these braided sticks!

Day 4

On our final morning in Prague, we decided to book a Castle Tour! The weather was absolutely atrocious but we toughed it out in the freezing rain! The Prague Castle is the largest in the world and it does not disappoint! Really, it is more of a collection of large palaces and a couple churches. St. Vitus’s Cathedral is particularly gorgeous (and was a safe haven from the rain). While we didn’t get to go in a ton of buildings, the tour did a good job of explaining what you needed to know. You could definitely spend a whole day – or more – here going inside museums and other buildings.

After the tour, we enjoyed a great overhead view of the city and a last delicious Czech meal before heading to our next stop, Berlin! By the way, the Czech language is SO difficult. The only words we learned are hello (ahoy!) and cheers (na zdravi!).

Thanks for the memories, Prague!

Czech Republic Uncategorized